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National News from NPR

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi is still missing, nearly two weeks after he entered the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul. And questions continue to swirl about his disappearance. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was dispatched to Riyadh, while, in Istanbul, a team of investigators searched the consulate.

President Trump told reporters on Monday morning that he had just spoken with Saudi King Salman bin Abdul-Aziz Al Saud, whom he said "firmly denied any knowledge" of what happened to Khashoggi.

But Trump had a theory.

Hospitals and health plans are increasingly using the huge amount of medical data they collect for research. It's a business worth billions of dollars, and sometimes those discoveries can be the foundation of new profit-making products and companies.

When a company profits from your data, should you get a cut?

This isn't just a hypothetical question. When Steven Petrow was 26 years old, back in 1984, he was treated for testicular cancer at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.

A Wyoming property rights attorney who's long criticized what she calls federal overreach over public land management will take a position as one of the U.S. Department of Interior's top litigators.

The DOI confirmed in an email Monday that Karen Budd-Falen will join the agency as deputy solicitor for parks and wildlife.

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Yana Kiziryan has two children. The youngest, Eddy, looks just like his cab-driving grandfather, Edward Agababian.

Edward drove a taxi in San Francisco. He loved it and dreamed of owning a medallion. These little tin permits used to be awarded on seniority. But to try to balance its transportation budget after the 2008 financial crisis, San Francisco started selling the medallions for 250,000 dollars a pop.

This was still a good deal. With a medallion, drivers could make between 5 and 7 grand a month. So Edward took out a loan and bought one.

Colorado voters next month will decide how close is too close when it comes to oil and gas drilling. A statewide ballot measure known as Proposition 112 would keep new wells dramatically farther away from homes and schools, expanding the distance from a 500 foot minimum to 2,500 feet, the biggest statewide setback requirement in the country. It's a change the industry says would threaten its very existence.

Updated at 5:22 p.m. ET

After Hurricane Michael slammed through the Florida panhandle and into Georgia last week, President Trump has surveyed damage and met with officials about recovery efforts.

At a briefing alongside Florida Gov. Rick Scott at Eglin Air Force Base, Trump praised the work of emergency responders and law enforcement.

"The job they've done in Florida has been incredible," he said, and described Scott as a leader who "steps up in the biggest emergencies, the biggest problems, and he gets it done."

Updated 4:08 p.m. ET

The former head of security for the Senate intelligence committee pleaded guilty to one count of lying to the FBI on Monday in federal court in Washington, D.C.

James Wolfe had been charged with three such counts, but he reached a plea agreement with the U.S. Attorney's office in exchange for leniency and to avoid a trial.

Wolfe was permitted to remain free until he's scheduled to return to court on Dec. 20 to be sentenced; he faces up to six months in prison.

It's a major milestone in the fight to recognize mental health and mental illness as global issues: a comprehensive report from the Lancet Commission on Global Mental Health, three years in the making, released this past week at a London summit with royals Prince William and Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge, in attendance to show their support for the cause.

But it was not a celebratory event. Threaded throughout the 45-page report is a lament that the world is ignoring millions of suffering people.

Idaho Fish and Game Commissioner Blake Fischer is under pressure to resign, after he shared photos from a hunting trip to Africa that showed him posing with a "family of baboons" that he said he killed.

In one photo, Fischer smiles as he props up the heads of two baboons, with a young animal sitting in another baboon's lap. The photos are part of an email that was initially acquired by the Idaho Statesman through a public information request filed with the governor's office.

Updated at 1:18 p.m. ET

To try to stave off the type of wildfires that have scorched California, Pacific Gas and Electric Co. warns it may pre-emptively turn off power for about 87,000 customers in 12 counties.

These areas are forecast to have weather conditions conducive to fires, including low humidity and gusty winds of up to 60 mph.

The British royals announced today that Meghan Markle and her husband, Prince Harry, are expecting their first child, due in the spring.

U.S. Sen. Ben Sasse has good timing.

That's not because his new book, Them: Why We Hate Each Other — and How to Heal, comes at a time when prospective presidential candidates are starting to publish arguments for their potential 2020 bids (the Nebraska Republican hasn't ruled out a run, but he's said it's unlikely.)

Updated at 2:09 p.m. ET

Flash floods have killed about a dozen people in the Aude region of southwest France, according to multiple local news outlets. A resident in one village called it "the apocalypse" as intense rains overwhelmed roads and drainage systems overnight into Monday morning.

Three months' worth of rain fell in just a few hours, France's Interior Ministry says, adding that some areas saw up to 14 inches. The rainwater was driven by winds up to 60 mph.

Sushi lovers will tell you that full-grown eels, called unagi, are pretty tasty. That's why Sara Rademaker started raising baby eels a few years ago ... in her basement near the coast of Maine.

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Sears was once the largest retailer in the United States. The company owned a radio station in Chicago with the call letters WLS, which stood for World's Largest Store. But now Sears is filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. NPR's David Schaper reports.

Hurricane Michael was especially brutal to the working-class suburbs just east of Panama City, Fla., where communities that were just scraping by before the storm now face a daunting recovery.

"This side of town is a poor side of town, and we are usually the last to get the services," said Matilda Conway, who stayed during the storm with her husband and her dogs in Springfield, Fla.

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Defense Secretary Jim Mattis "could" be considering a departure, Saudis can expect "severe punishment" for any involvement in the disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi, and climate change is probably real, but not caused by man, President Trump said in an interview aired Sunday on CBS' 60 Minutes.

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One of the last secrets from the Watergate scandal could soon be revealed.

A federal judge in Washington has ordered the National Archives to review key documents that have remained under seal for 44 years and prepare for their release.

Those papers, known as the "road map," helped advance the impeachment effort aimed at then-President Richard Nixon.

They've been under wraps since then but scholars say they're newly relevant today as President Trump faces down a different investigation.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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