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National News from NPR

High Winds Stroke Long Island As Storm Hits

Aug 28, 2011

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JOHN YDSTIE, Host:

Just east of New York City, towns in suburban Long Island are bracing for Irene. High winds and flooding are being reported in Nassau County.

We're joined on the line by Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano. Hello, Mr. Mangano.

ED MANGANO: How are you doing?

A Red Cross Storm Report From New Jersey

Aug 28, 2011

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

JOHN YDSTIE, Host:

Earlier this morning, Irene rolled through southern New Jersey. We're joined on the line by Pamela Grites, executive director of the American Red Cross Southern Shore Chapter.

Welcome to the program, Ms. Grites.

PAMELA GRITES: Well, thank you. Thank you very much.

New York City, The Night Before The Storm

Aug 28, 2011

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

JOHN YDSTIE, Host:

And back to New York City now, where people in Lower Manhattan were both prepared and puzzled as Irene approached.

NPR's Caitlyn Kenney describes what it was like in her neighborhood last night.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

JOHN YDSTIE, Host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm John Ydstie.

Rebels in Libya say they've completely liberated the capital, Tripoli. There is only sporadic fighting south of the city. And there is mounting evidence of mass executions during the recent fighting.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

JOHN YDSTIE, Host:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

JOHN YDSTIE, Host:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

JOHN YDSTIE, Host:

Stetson Kennedy was an important figure in the history of the Ku Klux Klan. But he's a man the Klan would rather forget.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

JOHN YDSTIE, Host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm John Ydstie.

New York Takes Cover As Irene Hits

Aug 28, 2011

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JOHN YDSTIE, Host:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

JOHN YDSTIE, Host:

Irene barreled through the southern and mid-Atlantic states in the early morning hours. NPR's Greg Allen was on the scene in North Carolina.

(SOUNDBITE OF WATER SPLASHING)

Cheating scandals have rocked a number of school districts across the country this year. The publicity is pushing states to look for better ways to detect and prevent tampering with the test results, and some say constant vigilance is required to guard against cheating.

(This live-blog is being updated throughout the day. Scroll down for our latest posts.)

Hurricane Irene made its second landfall near Little Egg Inlet, N.J. and then as it weakened into a tropical storm, the eye hit Coney Island in Brooklyn. That means New Yorkers woke up to howling winds and pounding rain.

At one point, the East River overflowed its banks and some parts of lower Manhattan saw knee-deep water. In New Jersey, two deaths were blamed on Irene. One of them happened after a woman was washed away by a flash flood.

This week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is expected to release its latest update on the food stamp program. It's an important indicator of the nation's economic health — and the prognosis is not good.

Food stamp use is up 70 percent over the past four years and that trend is expected to continue.

U.S. officials say that a CIA drone strike Aug. 22 killed al-Qaida's freshly minted second-in-command. Atiyah al-Rahman was a Libyan who was a key Osama bin Laden associate for decades.

The cable news network MSNBC chose civil rights activist Rev. Al Sharpton as its new host last week.

Starting Monday, Sharpton will begin hosting the network's 6 p.m. hour. His hiring came after weeks of speculation; Sharpton had been guest hosting in that time slot. MSNBC's decision has been about as controversial as Sharpton himself.

A war is ending and economic times are tough. Taxes are high and property foreclosures common. Streets are filled with protesters. Sounds familiar, I know, but I'm not talking about today's news.

It was the Revolutionary War, winding down in 1783, and the national government was massively in debt and having enormous difficulty paying the soldiers who had fought the war.

Parts of New York City are under evacuation orders, with more than 370,000 people ordered to leave low-lying areas ahead of Hurricane Irene, expected to arrive Sunday. But on Saturday afternoon, at least, some residents were making the most of it.

Steve Jobs stepped down this week as CEO of Apple after running the company for nearly 25 years.

The first Macintosh computer, the iPod audio player and most recently the iPad are just a few of the products Jobs created that have changed the way millions of people live their lives.

Comparisons can be drawn between Jobs and other great American innovators like Thomas Edison and Henry Ford, both technological titans in U.S. history.

Though rebels have consolidated control over Tripoli, life in the Libyan capital grows more difficult by the day. Residents scramble just to get basic supplies, such as food and water.

The city's tap water normally comes from what Moammar Gadhafi touted as the "Eighth Wonder of the World," the Great Man-Made River. The system channels water from deep wells in the desert to Tripoli and other parts of Western Libya.

Hurricane Irene has forced airlines to cancel more than 9,000 flights this weekend, with the AP reporting 3,600 cancellations on Saturday.

United Continental and Delta Air Lines, two of America's largest airlines, have each announced thousands of cancellations for the period between Saturday and Monday. International carriers, such as British Airways, have also cancelled flights to the U.S. East Coast that were scheduled for late Saturday or Sunday.

The grisly discovery of a dead body stuffed in a 35-gallon drum full of asphalt and dumped at a landfill next to North Carolina's Charlotte Motor Speedway kicks off Kathy Reichs' new novel, Flash and Bones.

Reichs, a forensic anthropologist, is the author of the books that inspired the Fox TV series Bones. Her latest sends her heroine, medical examiner Temperance Brennan, on a journey through the underbelly of Charlotte's NASCAR racing scene.

Week In News: Bernanke, Tax Breaks

Aug 27, 2011

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LAURA SULLIVAN, host: We're back with ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Laura Sullivan.

Representative JEB HENSARLING: How many more people have to suffer? How many more jobs have to be lost? It's simple, Mr. Speaker, no tax increases on nobody.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

For decades, the city of El Paso, in far West Texas, defied the look of most desert communities, with neighborhoods boasting lush, green lawns and residents freely running their sprinklers.

Then a study came out in 1979 that showed just how close El Paso was to a crisis: At its rate of water use, the city would run dry within 36 years.

"I can't make you ... I'm not going to arrest you."

But please, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) just told 600 senior citizens who live in Atlantic City: Let the state evacuate you before Hurricane Irene slams into the high-rise buildings where you live.

The residents have so far refused to leave.

Christie said the state is going to send buses to the seniors' buildings in the hopes they can be convinced to go to inland shelters.

"Let us walk you downstairs and put you on those buses," he added.

Is Libya The First 'True Arab Revolution'?

Aug 27, 2011

The Libyan rebels' takeover of Tripoli may be a landmark of the movement known as the Arab Spring, but does it qualify as a revolution?

James DeFronzo, author of the book Revolutions and Revolutionary Movements, thinks it's still too early to tell.

"You have to have some great structural, institutional change for an uprising to eventually be legitimately called a revolution," he tells weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan.

It took a U.S.-led invasion force of more than 200,000 troops nine months to scour Iraq's nearly 170,000 square miles before they captured Saddam Hussein, in one of the largest manhunts ever.

Now, Moammar Gadhafi is on the run in Libya — but chasing after him is a much smaller and less well-equipped force of Libyan rebels. They're trying to track down a fugitive who, like Saddam, is well-armed, well-funded and capable of winning popular support and sowing instability simply by evading his pursuers.

Libyan rebels fought to gain control of a major supply road to Tripoli on Saturday, seizing a border crossing with Tunisia and strengthening their hold on the oil-rich country as they hunt for Moammar Gadhafi.

Controlling the road from the Tunisian border to the capital would help ease growing shortages of fuel and food, particularly in the battle-scarred city.

The first deaths in the U.S. related to Hurricane Irene to be reported come from North Carolina.

The Raleigh News & Observer writes that:

As Hurricane Irene makes its way north, insurance companies are scrambling to get claims adjusters and other personnel in place up and down the East Coast and into New England.

Companies will be assessing the damage once Irene is through battering the northeastern states. If the hurricane hits as wide an area as is predicted, insured losses could be in the billions of dollars.

On the boardwalk of Ocean City, Md., Tony Russo Jr. is boarding up the windows of his family's restaurant, Tony's Pizza.

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