KETR

Stella M. Chávez

Stella Chávez is KERA’s education reporter/blogger. Her journalism roots run deep: She spent a decade and a half in newspapers – including seven years at The Dallas Morning News, where she covered education and won the Livingston Award for National Reporting, which is given annually to the best journalists across the country under age 35. The award-winning entry was  “Yolanda’s Crossing,” a seven-part DMN series she co-wrote that reconstructs the 5,000-mile journey of a young Mexican sexual-abuse victim from a small Oaxacan village to Dallas. For the last two years, she worked for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, where she was part of the agency’s outreach efforts on the Affordable Care Act and ran the regional office’s social media efforts.

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The sculpture honors Dallas officers Lorne Ahrens, Michael Krol, Michael Smith, and Patrick Zamarripa, and Dallas Area Rapid Transit Officer Brent Thompson.
Stella Chávez / KERA News

After a solemn ceremony, Dallas city and police officials unveiled a sculpture honoring five police officers killed in a sniper attack in downtown Dallas three years ago.

 Abigail Rubio (left) has had a difficult time since the immigration raid in which her father was detained. But she says her friend and classmate, Leslie Lopez (right), has helped. Leslie says she prays for Abigail.
Stella M. Chavez / KERA

The day of the raid still haunts principal Tammy Mariani. On August 28, agents from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, raided a Northeast Texas factory that makes vehicle trailers. In the nearby Honey Grove Independent School District, nearly two dozen children have parents who were arrested and detained.

Students in several rural school districts in Northeast Texas are getting access to college-level courses through a program called Pride Prep.
Stella M. Chavez / KERA

About 10 percent of students enrolled in college courses in Texas are still in high school. They're taking dual credit classes – that's where they get high school and college credit. These dual credit classes are growing in popularity, but in rural areas, access to college can be a struggle.

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