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civil rights

LaVelle Hendricks, Facebook

Dr. LaVelle Hendricks, associate professor of counseling at Texas A&M-Commerce, recently led a group of students on a trip to Mexico in which they learned about how the country treats and punishes those who violate its drug laws.  And Dr. Hendricks also will lead students on his regular tour of the historical sites from the civil-rights movement in the South during the 1960s.

Dr. David Arlington Talbot
TAMUC File Photo

The Hall of Languages on the campus of Texas A&M University-Commerce is one of the oldest buildings in town. It used to be home to the university’s library. On Tuesday, April 18, 2017, the structure will be renamed in recognition of Dr. David Arlington Talbot who was the first African American faculty member at East Texas State University, and later, the first African American university administrator.

Dr. Robert Green
provided image

Robert Green reached into his pocket and pulled out the most important object there is in the fight for civil justice and equality.

“This, he said, “changes everything.”

Tour guide Patricia DeLaine introuduces Texas A&M University-Commerce students to historic Kelly Ingram Park in Birmingham, Ala.
Mark Haslett

Every summer since 2013, Texas A&M University-Commerce students have had the opportunity to tour, on a university-sponsored trip, sites in Alabama relevant to the Civil Rights Movement. Perhaps more importantly, the tours have also included presentations by and conversations with activists and others who experienced that era. 

Texas A&M University-Commerce associate professor of counseling and Commerce school board member Dr. LaVelle Hendricks says the board had 31 applications for the Commerce ISD superintendent's job, as of the week of June 6.  The review of the applications will begin Monday, June 20.  Blake Cooper recently retired as superintendent. 

wikipedia.org
wikipedia.org

Texas A&M University-Commerce associate professor of counseling Dr. LaVelle Hendricks is leading 35 A&M-Commerce students on a tour of the major sites of the 1960s civil-rights movement in Alabama.