KETR

David Greene

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is, can you eat that?

You've heard of mystery meats, right? Well, how about mystery powders - courtesy of the ever-innovative food industry?

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREEENE, HOST:

There's been a boisterous scene outside the U.S. Supreme Court this morning. Inside, arguments over the Affordable Care Act, President Obama's landmark health care law, started about an ago.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

America is dotted with countless restaurants large and small. Many of those are well-loved for their distinct character — and for what they can teach diners about cooking, and about life.

One such establishment is Enoteca Maria, an Italian restaurant on New York's Staten Island.

After losing his mom and sister, owner Joe Scaravella missed sitting down with family for home-cooked meals. So he created something of an oxymoron: a place to go out for a home-cooked meal.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

As NASCAR fans know well, this year's Daytona 500 race was marked by rain delays and a massive explosion when a race car collided with a jet dryer truck. The race was supposed to be run on Sunday, but after all the delays, it got done early Tuesday morning.

I would like to rise up today in defense of Diet Coke. All diet sodas, in fact. But Diet Coke happens to be my favorite.

I like the stuff.

Cracking open a can of it, or pouring some over ice, helps me survive a long work day.

This love of Diet Coke is one reason my re-entry into the United States has been a little rocky. When I moved back recently after a reporting assignment in Russia, nobody warned me that war had been declared on Diet Coke.

The artillery was fired by Men's Health magazine.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

After a train journey of nearly 6,000 miles from Moscow, the Russian Pacific port of Vladivostok can feel like a different country. The people and the language are still Russian, but the strong Asian influence is undeniable. And many residents say the bond to the rest of Russia has been growing weaker, while the ties to Asia have been growing stronger since the Soviet breakup two decades ago. NPR's David Greene has this report as he wraps up his journey on the Trans-Siberian railway.

The last of three stories

Russia had one of the world's most famous revolutions nearly a century ago, in 1917. Yet for centuries, the country has seemed to prefer strong leaders who promised stability rather than revolutionary change. On a trip across Russia today on the Trans-Siberian railroad, NPR's David Greene found many Russians who expressed disappointment with their current government. But most said they wanted changes to be gradual, and were not looking for a major upheaval.

Second of three parts

Seven time zones and thousands of miles separate Russia's capital, Moscow, from the port city of Vladivostok on the Pacific Ocean. NPR journalists traveled the full length of the Trans-Siberian railroad and report on how Russia's history has shaped its people, and where, 20 years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russians want their country to go.

First of three parts

Two decades after the collapse of communist rule, just where is Russia headed? Scholars, diplomats and poets are spending careers contemplating the question.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

When it comes to football there are two types of compelling games. One, the most people like, when teams battle back and forth to a dramatic finish. The other, when one team totally dominates to such an extent that all you can do is watch in awe.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Of all the economic downturns of the past few years, the tiny European nation of Latvia may have suffered as much as any place. Incomes fell and families suffered as the government implemented harsh austerity measures.

Now, the citizens of this former Soviet republic seem more open to what was once unthinkable: backing a social democratic party that's pro-Russian.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, Host:

Good morning, Cokie.

COKIE ROBERTS: Hi, David.

GREENE: So Congress is already pretty unpopular and David Welna just said the success of the supercommittee is looking increasingly elusive. What happens if they fail to act? Do they get even less popular?

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, Host:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, Host:

Last night, Major League Baseball's regular season went out with a bang.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPORTS BROADCAST)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Unintelligible) down the left field line. That ball is gone! And the Rays win it!

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, Host:

Sylvia, good morning.

SYLVIA POGGIOLI: Good morning.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, Host:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, Host:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, Host:

NPR White House correspondent Scott Horsley joins us on the line with more. Hey, Scott.

SCOTT HORSLEY: Good to be with you, David.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, Host:

And Quil, I know you were out on the streets. Tell us what's going on.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, host:

Let's talk about how long the political unity we saw yesterday will last with NPR's Cokie Roberts, who joins us most Mondays. Cokie, good morning.

COKIE ROBERTS: Hi, David.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, host:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, host:

The novels of Tom Rob Smith are set mostly in the Soviet Union of the 1950s, a time and a place where oppression was palpable and any wrong move could get a person sent to a prison thousands of miles away.

Smith's first thriller, Child 44, was the story of a Soviet security agent whose job was to spy on fellow citizens. While many authors are virtual tour guides in the places where they set their novels, Smith had actually only been to Moscow once before — in 1997, on a high school trip.

Vermont became an unexpected casualty of Hurricane Irene. The storm dropped up to seven inches of rain Sunday — flooding streams and sending rivers crashing over their banks. In the state highway system alone, 12 bridges were washed out.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, host:

And I'm David Greene. Renee Montagne is on assignment this month in Afghanistan.

Pages