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Jessica Jones

Jessica Jones covers both the legislature in Raleigh and politics across the state. Before her current assignment, Jessica was given the responsibility to open up WUNC's first Greensboro Bureau at the Triad Stage in 2009. She's a seasoned public radio reporter who's covered everything from education to immigration, and she's a regular contributor to NPR's news programs. Jessica started her career in journalism in Egypt, where she freelanced for international print and radio outlets. After stints in Washington, D.C. with Voice of America and NPR, Jessica joined the staff of WUNC in 1999. She is a graduate of Yale University.

Jessica left WUNC in August 2015.

  • After the conservative administration was forced out, Pedro Sánchez formed a cabinet with a record number of women, opened ports to refugees and even tweeted in Catalan.
  • Justice Department officials say Alamance County Sheriff Terry Johnson illegally targeted Latino drivers and detained people without probable cause. Johnson's attorneys say the charges are baseless.
  • Syrian composer Malek Jandali's parents were beaten after he criticized the Assad regime in a performance abroad. Now Jandali is asking American and European audiences to donate to Syrians in need.
  • Duke University is known for its basketball. But this year, Duke's fans are cheering for their football team, which has won the most games in its history. Lead by the national coach of the year, the Blue Devils are headed the Atlantic Coast Conference championship game.
  • Nationally, there is an increase in cities responding to visible poverty including homelessness by criminalizing it. In recent years, municipalities from Seattle to Tampa have cracked down on the homeless and groups that help them. Now, Raleigh, N.C., is trying to find middle ground between the homeless and business owners.
  • Same-sex couples in the military will be watching closely now that the U.S. Supreme Court is considering the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act. Anxiously awaiting a decision are Army lieutenant colonel Heather Mack and her wife, Ashley Broadway, who've been together for 15 years and have two children. They say repealing DOMA would help many enlisted same-sex military couples, who don't receive funds to move non-military spouses from one base to the next. But most of all, Broadway and Mack say repealing DOMA would give them the recognition they crave: to have their marriage officially recognized in every state in the country. Jessia Jones of WUNC talked with the couple.
  • In North Carolina Tuesday, voters approved a constitutional amendment banning gay marriage, civil unions and domestic partnerships. North Carolina becomes the 30th state to pass a measure outlawing same-sex marriage.
  • The state votes Tuesday whether to add an amendment to the state's Constitution that would ban same-sex marriage and civil unions, as well as domestic partnerships. One pollster says a majority of voters support the amendment — but many don't understand its scope.
  • Next month, voters will decide whether to change the state constitution to ban same-sex marriage, as well as civil unions and domestic partnerships. Leading Republican lawmakers think it's one of the most important issues facing voters. But some conservatives worry that the measure goes too far.
  • Several decades ago, more than half the states had eugenics laws — measures that allowed governments and others to forcibly sterilize people. It was a difficult chapter for many states and now North Carolina is looking to make amends. A task force says each of the state's 2,000 living victims should receive $50,000.