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coronavirus

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Paul Voss, Commerce Chamber of Commerce manager, says the city has lost only three businesses during the coronavirus situation, but two have taken over the previous spots, so the net loss is only one.  Voss says small businesses have shown remarkable resilience during the ordeal.

Greenville Animal Hospital, Facebook

Dr. Karri McCreary, veterinarian and co-owner of the Greenville Animal Hospital, reflects on a Pew Research Center study that shows millenials are spending a lot of money on their pets during the coronavirus pandemic, much more than baby boomers.

Commerce ISD, Facebook

Charlie Alderman, Commerce ISD superintendent, says about 14-15% of Commerce students are engaged in online learning, down from 19% at the beginning of the school year.  He expects that percentage to decline further in the near future.  Only one student has tested postive for the coronavirus in about the past week and a half, the superintedent says.

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Commerce Mayor Wyman Williams says the City Council received a report from Acting City Manager Ned Muse that the city actually saw an increase in sales-tax and property tax revenue during the 2019-20 fiscal year, just ended, despite the coronavirus lockdowns.  One reason is a new state law that allows cities to receive sales taxes from online purchases. 

Commerce Chamber of Commerce, Facebook

Paul Voss, Commerce Chamber of Commerce president, says the Chamber has decided not to hold the annual Bois D'Arc Bash this year for the first time since it started in 1987.  The reason, of course, is the continuing threat of the coronavirus.  Paul says not holding the popular celebration will cause considerable financial stress for the Chamber.

Commerce ISD

Charlie Alderman, Commerce ISD superintendent, says Commerce High School reopens today (Monday, August 31) and Commerce Elementary School will reopen Tuesday, September 1.  The schools closed last week because at 10 percent of students had a "close contact" with someone who had tested positive for the coronavirus.  The new standard set by the school board will be that the schools will close if one percent of students test positive for COVID-19.

20047-N-DA693-1179 Navy Medicine / Creative Commons

Kim Saenz, director of the Hunt Regional Emergency Centers in Commerce and Quinlan, reflects on an article describing the stress that emegency-room nurses and other personnel are feeling after months of working during the coronavirus pandemic.  The article recommends that nurses be required to reveive regular counseling.

Texas A&M Agrilife

Hunt County Historical Commission chairman Carol Taylor contrasts the effects of the current coronavirus pandemic to the devasting 1918 flu outbreak in North Texas.  Many closings occurred then, and people were urged to wear masks.

Cooper Lake State Park, Facebook

Steve Killian, superintendent of Cooper Lake State Park, says attendance is up this summer at the park compared to last year, despite ... or perhaps, because of ... the coronavirus situation.  In fact, Cooper Lake is among the top 10 state parks in attendance this summer. Steve says the park has various ways of helping families enjoy the park even though the organized programs led by park rangers are not taking place for the time being.

Texas A&M Agrilife

Frances Dalbey, outreach specialist with Hunt Regional Healthcare, discusses ways of keeping senior citizens connected to friends and family despsite coronavirus restrictions.  There is no one-size-fits all solution, so choose things that suit you and senior citizens who are close to you and commit to them.

Commerce ISD, Facebook

Commerce ISD Superintendent Charlie Alderman says things went smoothly on the district's first day of schools since the coronavirus hit last March. For at least the first two weeks, students will use a "hybrid" schedule in which  they are divided in two groups, with each group attending classes two days per week and working online on  the other days.  Charlie says the students he saw were wearing their masks and maintaining social distancing on the first day.

Bras for the Cause, Facebook

Pud Kearns of Housewarmers of Greenville, and one of the major leaders of Bras for the Cause, says the annual fund-raising event for Hunt Regional Healthcare will be virtual this year on Facebook Live, Thursday evening, October 8, because of the situation with the coronavirus.  A virtual kickoff event will also take place on Facebook Live at 7 p.m., Thursday night, August 20.

Hunt Regional Healthcare

Frances Dalbey, outreach specialist for Hunt Regional Healthcare, says individuals should not put off health screenings despite the inconveniences caused by the coronavirus pandemic.  Frances says Hunt Regional is able to provide all screenings in a safe manner.  Frances also discusses recent changes in the rules for visitors at the Hunt Regional Medical Center in Greenville.

Sulphur Springs ISD, Facebook

Emily Glass, co-owner of the Venue at two-nineteen in downtown Sulphur Springs and former mayor of the city, says the Sulphur Springs school board has decided to delay the start of the school year until Tuesday, September 1 because of the coronavirus threat.  Emily also says the Sulphur Springs Senior Center is in need of new volunteers to keep the "Meal a Day" program going.

Commerce ISD

Commerce ISD Superintendent Charlie Alderman says the school board has decided to delay the start of the new school year one week, until Tuesday, August 11, and the schools will start with a "hybrid schedule" of two days in school and three days at home for at least the first two weeks.

Chevrolet, Facebook

Derek Price, author of the "Cargazing" column in the Herald-Banner and syndicated nationally, reflects on a list of 20 cars and trucks selling better this year in the coronavirus pandemic than last year, such as the Chevrolet Silverado.  Most auto sales have fallen drastically.  Derek, owner of Celebrate Media Group in Greenville, says he's seen the demand for live streaming vid

Texas A&M Agrilife

Sarah Latham, Rains County Agrilife Extension Agent, discusses a recent chart produced by the Texas Medical Association, and shared on the Rains County Agrilife Facebook page, that shows the relative probability of catching the coronavirus from various activities.  Sarah also comments on a perennial summer problem in Texas, avoiding ticks.

KETR

Byron Taylor, president and CEO of the Greenville Chamber of Commerce, discusses plans for the city of Greenville's Fourth of July fireworks show, which has now been postponed because of the coronavirus threat.  The annual Park Street Fourth of July parade has been cancelled.  Byron also discusses the "Forward Greenville" survey, that is seeking opinions from citizens on the future direction of the city.

Commerce ISD, Facebook

Commerce ISD superintendent Charlie Alderman discusses the planning for students to return to school on August 4, under the guidelines announced by the Texas Education Agency.  Mr.

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Commerce Mayor Wyman Williams says city revenues from sales taxes and property taxes are holding up pretty well during the coronavirus crisis.  The mayor says the city got a good audit report recently, that will help in the recruitment of new city manager.

Commerce Chamber of Commerce, Facebook

Paul Voss, Commerce Chamber of Commerce manager, says Hunt County has purchased the building to the east of the Chamber office on Main Street in downtown Commerce.  Renovation of the building is underway and it soon serve as the office for the Justice of the Peace Kerry Crews and Constable Wayne "Doc" Pierce.  Also, Paul says a number of Commerce businesses have now received checks from the federal government to help offset the closings caused by the coronavirus.

Amazon.com

Our books commentator, Sharon Feldt of Sulphur Springs, says the recent best-selled "One for the Blackbird, One for the Crow" by Olivia Hawker has a storyline that relates to our situation in the current coronavirus crisis.  It is the story of two families facing extreme hardship on the Wyoming frontier.  Sharon also reviews

Hunt Regional Healthcare

Pud Kearns with Housewarmers of Greenville and Bras for the Cause says the Hunt Regional Medical Center is using a robot provided by Bras for the Cause several years ago to sterilize personal protective equipment (PPE) each day.  The robot was originally provided to sterilize cancer-treatment facilities with ultraviolet light, but Hunt Regional realized it could also be used to sterilize valuable PPE in the coronavirus crisis.  Pud also says she believes m

C-CAP, Facebook

Dr. Bob Johnson and Dr.

KETR

Paul Voss, manager of the Commerce Chamber of Commerce, says the chamber will assist businesses in applying for the federal loans that have been made available.  He says the council can help businesses apply online, and has packets that contain the information needed to apply.

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Kim Saenz, the director of the Hunt Regional Emergency Centers in Commerce and Quinlan, discusses the steps involved when a person is tested for the coronavirus.  She says Hunt Regional is now able to test individuals for antibodies.  Kim says all visitors to Hunt Regional facilities receive a brief medical check-up when entering the building to see if they may have coronavirus symptoms.

As testing expands, the presence of COVID-19 in Texas nursing homes is becoming apparent.
NPR

One death in a Paris nursing home and dozens of other confirmed COVID-19 cases in that home and one in Rockwall are consistent with a nationwide trend of residents and staff of long-term care facilities coming down with the illness caused by the coronavirus.

State Comptroller's Office

Dr. Dale Funderburk, Texas A&M-Commerce economics professor, says Gov. Greg Abbott's decision to restart the Texas economy, limiting many businesses to 25 percent capacity in their buildings, seems a reasonable move.  But Dr. Funderburk says it is impossible to know if 25 percent is too large or too small as the state attempts to balance the health and the economic risks.

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